Exhibition: Take a Seat! An exhibition of Lincolnshire chairs, Louth Museum, 13th September to 28th October 2017

 

Members will be interested to hear about Take a Seat! An exhibition of  Lincolnshire craftsman-made chairs which will be held at Louth Museum from 13th September to 28th October 2017.

The extraordinary history of chairmaking at the beginning of the nineteenth century in Lincolnshire has only recently been revealed by vernacular furniture historian and long standing member of the RFS, William Sergeant.  He has shown that the scale of windsor chair manufacture was unique in the UK and was far greater than was previously thought. During this period hundreds of thousands of chairs were made in workshops in Grantham, Sleaford, Boston, and then later in Stamford and Bourne. They were distributed and sold all over the Midlands and the North. Their style is distinct to the county and examples can still be found today in good condition, in auctions and antique shops.

Previous to this, in the eighteenth century, the simple rush seated ladderback chair had superseded the stool in country households. Lincolnshire produced large numbers of these chairs, with the centre of manufacture around Louth, Spilsby and Alford, extending later to Boston and Spalding. It is rare for good examples to have survived to the present day.

William Sergeant has been collecting and researching Lincolnshire’s chairs and is recognised as the country’s leading authority on the subject.  On the evening of Tuesday 10th October he will be giving a talk on the subject, and on Saturday 14th October  there will be an open day chair surgery: the aim of which is to try and find well provenanced local chairs, in the hope of establishing exactly which patterns were made in the towns of Spilsby, Alford, Caistor and Louth.

Antique Metalware Society celebrates 25th anniversary with an online exhibition

The Antique Metalware Society, with a world-wide membership, is devoted to increasing the knowledge and promoting the appreciation of base-metal objects of all kinds and historical periods.

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‘Touch Base: A Visual Celebration of 25 Years’ is a web-based exhibition in which over 100 objects have been assembled to show the diversity and appeal of the base metals and their uses. The range of exhibits includes candlesticks, cauldrons, nutcrackers, snuff boxes, fire grates and many unusual and rare objects. Copper, brass, bronze, iron and Britannia metal all feature and each object is accompanied by photographs and a detailed explanatory text.

Dr Christopher Green, Chairman of the Antique Metalware Society, sums up the exhibition ‘ this is the metalware people have lived with day to day, at home, at work and at leisure. It’s a wonderful record of the use to which base metals have been put: the practical, the ingenious and sometimes the strange and curious.’

Click here to visit the exhibition: http://www.Antiquemetalwaresociety.org.uk

More information is available from Dr Geoff Smaldon, Secretary: geoff.smaldon@gmail.com or antiquemetalwaresociety@gmail.com

Exhibition of Lincolnshire Chairs, 8th – 18th September 2016

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Members will be interested to hear about an exhibition of the largest collection of Lincolnshire windsor and rush-seated chairs to be held at Belton House this September. This will be a fascinating chance to learn about fine local chair-making and the best local craftsmanship, with several talks by William Sergeant from the Lincolnshire Chair Museum.

There will be free entrance on Saturday 10th September to coincide with the National Heritage Open Day.

Exhibition: Make Yourself Comfortable, 28 March – 23 October, Chatsworth House

RFS members may be interested in this invitation “to experience Chatsworth in a new way; to take a seat and make yourself comfortable.”

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Chatsworth is “turning to contemporary furniture designers to provide a completely different experience for our visitors”.  A number of works have been specially commissioned for the exhibition by established and emerging designers including a collaboration with students at Sheffield Hallam University.

There is also an opportunity to  join the curator, Hannah Obee, for a Make Yourself Comfortable tour on 24 April and 26 June.

For more information, see here: http://www.chatsworth.org/attractions-and-events/events/event/make-yourself-comfortable

Exhibition: An Abiding Standard, Royal Academy of Arts, 25th February – 24th May

241. "The Chair Maker", engraving, 1944 [215 x 154 mm] Private Collection. © Stanley Anderson Estate

241. “The Chair Maker”, engraving, 1944 [215 x 154 mm] Private Collection. © Stanley Anderson Estate

Stanley Anderson RA (1884-1960) was a key figure in the revival of engraving in the 1920s, best known for his series of prints depicting England’s vanishing rural crafts. ‘The Chair Maker’, very probably of Jack Goodchild, one of the last of the Chiltern makers, is typical of his work to be shown in an exhibition, An Abiding Standard, at the Royal Academy of Arts, running from 25th February – 24th. May. For more information see the RA website here.
Admission is £3, or free to holders of tickets to other current exhibitions at the RA including the magnificent Rubens show. A catalogue raisonne will be published to coincide with the exhibition.

Exhibition: Pots and Tiles of the Middle Ages, Sam Fogg, until May 16th

 

Pots and TilesReaders may be interested to know about a fascinating  exhibition currently on at the Sam Fogg gallery in London,W1:  Pots and Tiles of the Middle Ages.  This rare functional pottery was described many years ago by W. B. Honey as the some of the most beautiful pottery in the world.

The  collection of largely English and French items (including at least one pot from Dorset and a large number of tiles from a church in Somerset) has been assembled by Maureen Mellor of Oxford University over the last 20 years and is displayed at eye level with no glass barrier. You can view a selection of the exhibits here.

Entry is free and there is a fine illustrated catalogue at £20, see here. The show runs until May 16th.