Lecture – Sunday, 22 November 2020, 19:00 (GMT): Wilhemina Castelijns – Transforming a Town Hall into a Royal Palace: Empire Furniture in Amsterdam

We are again grateful to the Furniture History Society and British & Irish Furniture Makers Online for their kindness in inviting RFS members to the latest in their series of free online lectures.

Sunday, 22 November 2020, 19:00 (GMT): Wilhemina Castelijns – Transforming a Town Hall into a Royal Palace: Empire Furniture in Amsterdam.

The Dutch royal palaces contain one of the largest collections of Empire furniture outside of France. On his arrival in the Netherlands in 1806, the country’s first king Louis Napoleon chose Amsterdam as his new place of residence and started an enormous refurnishing campaign, turning the former town hall into a royal palace, decorated in the empire style that was fashionable at his brothers court. Although French tapissiers, bronziers, furniture- and clockmakers were asked to deliver some important new works, the King soon explicitly turned to Dutch craftsmen, ordering hundreds of pieces of furniture. This paper will give an overview of the resulting Empire collection in Amsterdam, the craftsmen that were involved in its creation and the (foreign) examples that influenced its design. Additionally, some examples of Empire furniture at the other palaces will be shown, providing a brief introduction of the empire style furniture ordered by subsequent monarchs.

Wilhemina received an MA in Fine and Decorative Art form Sotheby’s Institute of Art in 2016 and went on to work as Junior Curator of Furniture at the Rijksmuseum, where she assisted Reinier Baarsen with the exhibition ‘Kwab: Dutch Design in the Age of Rembrandt’. She then worked as curatorial intern at the Royal Collection Trust before moving back to the Netherlands where she is now working for the Royal Household as Keeper of the Royal Furniture.

Zoom joining instructions:

Time: Nov 22, 2020 07:00 PM London

https://zoom.us/j/97495831151?pwd=bHB0NXhlbHZWMXpFbWFNK1VENm9SQT09
Meeting ID: 974 9583 1151
Passcode: 475514

Attendees will be admitted from the waiting room from 18.45.  Please make sure you are muted and your cameras are turned off.  Please note that for security reasons we will lock the meeting at 19.30, so please make sure you have joined us by then.  The lecture will be followed by a round of Q&A.  Please use the chat message box at the bottom of your Zoom window.  If you are using Zoom software, please note that Zoom have increased their security and you may be required to install an update.
 
We hope to see many of you on Sunday, 22 November.
 
For any queries, please email events@furniturehistorysociety.org

Other notices:
SPACES STILL AVAILABLE
Online Lecture
The Story of Matthew Boulton and Soho House

Tuesday, 24 November 2020 15.00 (GMT)
with Birmingham Museums
 The talk will be delivered by one of the Museum’s expert tour guides over Zoom and last for about one hour and 15 minutes. Click here for more information on the FHS website.

Soho House is an 18th century mansion and was the home of the great industrialist Matthew Boulton for over 40 years, it was the epicentre for many changes brought about through the Industrial Revolution. This talk will take you through this historical property’s wonderfully preserved rooms, and discover the objects and tales behind them. We’ll look at the people that lived here, and learn about Boulton’s life, legacy, and the birth of the industrial revolution in the heart of Handsworth.

Soho House was also the meeting place for the Lunar Society, where radical scientific and technological debates were the centre of discussion. We’ll also look at the members of the lunar society, a group of free thinking scientists and industrialists including Joseph Priestley, Erasmus Darwin, Josiah Wedgwood, James Watt, and William Withering.

On 19 November 2020The Glass Society is hosting a free lecture by the stained glass conservation specialist Jonathan Cooke whose work recreating a lost William Collins window at the Soane Museum featured recently in Reconstructing Soane. Click here for  further details.

Décoration intérieure et plaisir des sens (1700-1850) 3 and 4 December 2020 online

online / Université de Genève (Unité d’histoire de l’art), Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Equipe de recherche HiCSA et Ecole doctorale d’histoire de l’art), 03. – 04.12.2020

Décoration intérieure et plaisir des sens (1700-1850)
Colloque international en ligne – 3 et 4 décembre 2020 organisé par l’Université de Genève (Unité d’histoire de l’art) et l’Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Equipe de recherche HiCSA et Ecole doctorale d’histoire de l’art).

Lien pour l’inscription – jeudi 3 décembre :

https://unige.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_6uqfcGYcTPKviyDc7H_sQA

Lien pour l’inscription – vendredi 4 décembre :

https://unige.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_oe2wR8RUSAe1DNOS34S9EQ

PROGRAMME
Jeudi 3 décembre, 14h
Introduction, Bérangère Poulain (Université de Genève) et Barbara Jouves-Hann (Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne)

Session 1 : mobilier, modérée par Jean-Jacques Gautier (Mobilier national)
14h30 Dessin d’ornemaniste et création du meuble, Thibaut Wolvesperges (Université Paris-Sorbonne)

15h La naissance du bureau et de la commode au XVIIe siècle, Daniel Alcouffe (Musée du Louvre)

15h30 Le cabinet particulier du roi Louis XIV à Versailles secrets autour des transformations d’un bureau, Élisabeth Caude (Château de Versailles) et Frédéric Leblanc (C2RMF)

Pause

16h30 « Une tente sous laquelle on dort » : l’alcôve et le lit d’alcôve dans la chambre au XVIIIe, Muriel Barbier (Mobilier national)

17h Formes, matérialité et usages du mobilier, Ulrich Leben (Indépendant) Conclusion, Marc-André Paulin (Université de Lille/C2RMF)

Vendredi 4 décembre, 9h
Introduction, Noémi Duperron (Université de Genève) et Maxime Georges Métraux (Université Paris-Sorbonne/Galerie Hubert Duchemin)

Session 2 : Théorie, modérée par Carl Magnusson (Université de Lausanne)
9h30 Fraîcheur, odeurs et procédés narratifs : Le génie de l’architecture de Le Camus de Mézières à la lumière de la théorie des jardins, Desmond-Bryan Kraege (Université de Lausanne)

10h00 Nouvelles typologies d’habitation au XVIIIe siècle, Aurélien Davrius (École nationale supérieure d’architecture Paris-Malaquais)

Pause

11h00 Construire le boudoir idéal : état de l’influence réciproque de la littérature sur les traités d’architecture au XVIIIe siècle, Joséphine Grimm (École nationale des Chartes)

11h30 Une spatialité intérieure, Madame de Maisonneuve et le Dôme des Invalides, Christina Contandriopoulos (Université du Québec à Montréal)

Session 3 : Techniques, modérée par Jan blanc (Université de Genève)
14h30 Thermal comfort, spatial order and objects in country houses, Sweden c.1740–1800, Johanna Ilmakunnas (Åbo Akademi University)

15h Le feu caché. Introduction du confort thermique et métamorphoses de l’économie des sens (France, 1700-1850), Olivier Jandot (Université Artois)

Pause

16h30 L’odeur des vernis ou la toxicité du confort au XVIIIe siècle, Erika Wicky (Université Lumière Lyon 2)

17h Les effets magnifiques ou les agréments de la serrurerie dans la décoration intérieure française de la fin du règne de Louis XIV à la Monarchie de Juillet, Carine Desrondiers (Université Rennes 2)

Conclusion générale et pistes de réflexion, Christian Michel (Université de Genève) —-

Colloque organisé par Noémi Duperron (Université de Genève), Barbara Jouves- Hann (Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne), Maxime Georges Métraux (Université Paris-Sorbonne/Galerie Hubert Duchemin), Bérangère Poulain (Université de Genève) et Marc-André Paulin (Université de Lille/Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musées de France).

Informations et contact : decoration.et.plaisir@gmail.com

Lecture – Sunday, 8 November 2020, 19:00 (GMT) – Reattributing the Chippendale Daybeds at Stanway House: the case for Scottish furniture makers Alexander Peter and William Mathie by Dr Sebastian Pryke

We are again grateful to the Furniture History Society and British & Irish Furniture Makers Online for their kindness in inviting RFS members to the latest in their series of free online lectures.

British & Irish Furniture Makers Online in collaboration with The Furniture History Society invites you to a free online Sunday lecture:

Reattributing the Chippendale Daybeds at Stanway House: the case for Scottish furniture makers Alexander Peter and William Mathie
by Dr Sebastian Pryke

Sunday, 8 November 2020, 19:00 (GMT)

Photo credit

If Alexander Peter and William Mathie are known at all it is for their work at Dumfries House complementing the famous furniture provided by Thomas Chippendale. They both, and Peter in particular, enjoyed rich careers in Scotland making highly desirable furniture. This talk will explore their known body of work in the context of other furniture made by their peers in Scotland.  Sebastian will share his research and exciting theories concerning the attribution of some furniture, looking especially at the surviving pieces made for Francis Charteris and the new house he was building in East Lothian in the 1750s. 

Dr Sebastian Pryke’s postgraduate research on the eighteenth century furniture trade in Edinburgh not only earned him a PhD but gave him a lifelong passion for Scottish furniture.  This has led to a career in Scottish heritage, art and antiques, initially as an historic buildings inspector at Historic Scotland and then as a fine art auctioneer, culminating in a senior position at Lyon & Turnbull. Most recently, Sebastian has established his own consultancy providing services to the fine art insurance industry, as well as the wider antiques and heritage sectors.  In 2017 Sebastian launched an antique furniture business: At the Sign of the Pelican.

His interest in the creation and development of country houses resulted in a long term commitment to the Historic House Association for Scotland, where he served in various roles as a committee member for ten years.  He has been a council member of the Architectural Heritage Society of Scotland and a council member of the Cockburn Association (Edinburgh’s civic trust).  In addition he has found time to serve as a council member of the Furniture History Society. Sebastian has contributed to many academic Journals, as well as more popular magazines and has lectured widely

Zoom joining details:

Meeting ID: 918 6429 8500 Password: 609792

Attendees will be admitted from the waiting room from 18.45.  Please make sure you are muted and your cameras are turned off.  Please note that for security reasons we will lock the meeting at 19.30, so please make sure you have joined us by then. The lecture will be followed by a round of Q&A.  Please use the chat message box at the bottom of your Zoom window. If you are using Zoom software, Zoom have increased their security and you may be required to install an update. We hope to see many of you on Sunday, 8 November. For any queries, please email 

Other Notices:
The Decorative Arts Society Lecture

Eileen Grey (1878-1976) by Dr Lis Darby

Sunday, 15 November 2020 at 18:00 (GMT)
 Eileen Gray (1878-1976) was an extraordinarily versatile and creative figure of the 1910s to 1930s. She spent most of her working life in Paris and managed to operate successfully within the male-dominated professions of architecture and design. Gray’s designs for furniture and lighting demonstrated an experimental and original approach to form and materials and will constitute the focus of this lecture. Dr Darby’s book Re-Issue, Re-Imagine, Re-Make: Appropriation in Contemporary Furniture Design is published by Lund Humphries in September 2020.

For further details contact Sarah Nichols sarah.c.nichols@me.com 07748 020781.

Claudia Kinmonth’s Irish Country Furniture and Furnishings 1700-2000: Signed copies and a 20% Discount for RFS members

This month sees the publication of Claudia Kinmonth’s keenly awaited Irish Country Furniture and Furnishings 1700-2000 (pp. 550 illus 448., Cork University Press). Following the Society’s Irish tour last year and as a thank you to the RFS for its support for the book Claudia has arranged a special 20% discount from the publisher for RFS members on the RRP €39.00 or £35.00 (plus p&p.), valid until the end of December. The book will also be available from good bookshops by about 20 November 2020, and online, usually free of postage, from Book Depository. To order a signed copy from the publisher, email: maureen.fitzgerald@ucc.ie and quote the code ‘RFS’. Signed copies must be ordered before 31 December 2020. Listen to Claudia’s recent interview on BBC Radio Ulster (at 26 mins 40 seconds into the programme). For more information please check Claudia’s website and her Twitter.

Lecture – Sunday, 1 November 2020, 19:00 – Dr Francesca Vanke – ‘A rich stone table inlaid’: the Paston collection and the re-discovery of the pietre dure table-top

We are again grateful to the Furniture History Society for their kindness in inviting RFS members to the latest in their series of free online lectures:

The Furniture History Society invites you to the latest in our series of free online lectures:

Dr Francesca Vanke

Senior Curator and Keeper of Fine and Decorative Art

(Norwich Castle Museum & Art Gallery)

‘A rich stone table inlaid’: the Paston collection and the re-discovery of the pietre dure table-top
 
 
Sunday, 1 November 2020, 19:00 (BST)
 
unnamed-19
Pietre dure tabletop, circa 1625, with coats of arms, 1638

Francesca Vanke FSA is a Senior Curator and Keeper of Fine and Decorative Art at Norwich Castle Museum & Art Gallery.  She gained her BA in classics from Oxford, and an MA in art conservation and a PhD in history from Camberwell College of Art.  Her academic speciality is the history of collecting and orientalism, but she researches a wide range of related subjects.  Her studies have most recently included seventeenth century art, material culture and alchemy, working towards exhibitions on Rembrandt, and The Paston Treasure, for Norwich Castle She is particularly interested in interdisciplinary research.  

For more details, including a short summary of this lecture and instructions for joining the meeting, please click here.

AGM Reminder

You will already have seen a post indicating that the AGM has had to be arranged as a Zoom meeting. It indicated that you should contact Jeremy Rycroft on justj2r2@gmail.com to obtain the code and password. This arrangement stops non-members accessing and interfering with the meeting. We need more members to join the AGM to reach our quorum. Please email Jeremy to get the meeting reference code and log on Saturday 24 October at 2:30 p.m., if you are able to. You will be sent a copy of the Agenda, last year’s AGM minutes and some guidance on using Zoom. If you have questions, please send these in in advance to Jeremy Rycroft too, if possible, so someone is ready to answer them.

The Butter Museum in Cork

The Regional Furniture Society visited the Butter Museum in Cork during its visit to Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic in September 2019.  The film below was made by the Butter Museum as part of a conservation project. The explanations of butter-making are by Dr Claudia Kinmonth, author of the book Irish Country Furniture. A revised edition of the book is being published by Cork University Press.  Claudia received a grant towards the production of this book from the Society.

Butter Museum Culture Night 2020

Lecture: Sunday, 18 October 2020, 19:00 (BST) – Imported British Furniture for the South by Tom Savage – Director, External Affairs (Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library)

We are again grateful to the Furniture History Society for their kindness in inviting RFS members to the latest in their series of free online lectures:

Tom Savage
Director, External Affairs (Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library)

Imported British Furniture for the South

Sunday, 18 October 2020, 19:00 (BST)

Drayton Hall Desk and Bookcase, Britain, c. 1745-50; Drayton Hall Museum Collection (NT 98.6.3), courtesy of Drayton Hall, an historic site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, gift of Mr Charles H. Drayton III, and Mrs Martha Drayton Mood.
Photograph courtesy of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.

Tom Savage is the Director of External Affairs for Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library. From 1998 to 2005, he was Senior Vice President and Director of Sotheby’s Institute of Art for North and South America where he directed The Sotheby’s American Arts Course. From 1981 until 1998, he was Curator and Director of Museums for Historic Charleston Foundation.
 
This lecture will look at surviving examples and contemporary documents to re-examine the place of British imported furniture in the regions of Tidewater Virginia and the Low Country of South Carolina. The influence of British imports on local production as well as the role of the factor will be discussed.

Zoom joining instructions:

Time: Oct 18, 2020 07:00 PM London
https://zoom.us/j/94930450585?pwd=cW5tdEEyTE5vN3NIb1dZUGhwUG5wQT09
 
Meeting ID: 949 3045 0585
Passcode: 081319
 
Attendees will be admitted from the waiting room from 18.45. Please make sure you are muted and your cameras are turned off. Please note that for security reasons we will lock the meeting at 19.20, so please make sure you have joined us by then.
 
The lecture will be followed by a round of Q & A. Please use the chat message box at the bottom of your zoom window.
 
If you are using Zoom software, Zoom have increased their security and you may be required to install an update.
 
The FHS has decided to invite the members of other like-minded societies around the world. If you are not yet a member but would like to join the society, please check out our website https://www.furniturehistorysociety.org for more information.
 
We hope to see many of you on Sunday, 18 October.

Index to the Newsletters

The index of all the pieces which have appeared in the Newsletters has been updated for the most recent issue No 73.

William Sergeant has pointed out to me that in my own piece about chairs in Lincolnshire wills and inventories the links in the Newsletter piece are tricky to navigate. 

The links below should remedy the issue:

1452: A Flemish chair in the inventory of William Duffield, Canon Residentiary of York, Southwell and Beverley, and Fellow of Merton College, Oxford

1505 to 1530 & 1530 to 1532: early references to chairs, stools, forms, trestles and settles in Lincolnshire Wills

1532 to 1534: early references to chairs in Lincolnshire Wills

1661 – 1714 Probate Inventories – what were the citizens of Lincoln sitting on during the reigns of Charles II, James II, William & Mary and Anne?

1663 – Bishop Sanderson’s Flagg-Bottomed Chairs and Other Stories

1665 – Inventory of John Brooke, Chair maker of St Martin’s Parish, Lincoln

1691 – Inventory of William Botamley, Chair maker of Gainsborough, Lincolnshire

1696 – Probate Inventory of John Dring of St Peter’s in the Arches, Lincoln 4th December 1696

1705 – John Ashton late of Spalding in the County of Lincoln, chair maker – Inventory

1718 – 1729 The comparative value of an early 18th century Windsor chair

Julian Parker

Website Editor

The Churches Conservation Trust Online Lectures Series – October 2020

Members may be interested in this lecture series being given online by the Churches Conservation Trust. They are livestreamed via the CCT Facebook page.

Thursday 1st October, 1-2pm (GMT): Dr Gabriel Byng – Construction, Change and Crisis: Church building in the shadow of the Black Death

Thursday 8th October, 1-2pm (GMT): Prof. Paul Binski – A Tomb with a View: Medieval Death

Thursday 15th October, 1-2pm (GMT): Dr Cindy Wood – A Medieval Guide to Escaping Purgatory: The practices of the late Medieval Cult of the Dead

Thursday 22nd October, 1-2pm (GMT): Dr Francis Young- Macabre Church Lore: Ghosts, Witches and Monsters in England’s Churches and Churchyards

Thursday 29th October, 1-2pm (GMT): Suzie Lennox – Raiders of the Grave: Macabre tales of Bodysnatchers & what churches did to stop them

Many thanks to Roisin Astell for the text and links to the programme.